Jordan Koschei jordan koschei

Marginal Changes That Have Improved my Quality of Life

Here are some marginal changes that have had outsized effects on my quality of life. Maybe some of them will work for you.

  • Light candles. I keep a few different candles around, and look forward to lighting one each morning. It’s amazing the effect that a pleasant scent can have on my mood.
  • Steep some tea. There’s something calming about the process of making tea, and I like the rhythm it gives my day as I finish one cup and start to make another.
  • Learn to love cooking. It’s healthier and more cost-effective than going out or ordering takeout, and the act of cooking is food for the soul. The ritual provides an excellent rhythm for the day, and I always look forward to making dinner in the evening.
  • Drink more water. If I don’t drink enough during the day, I get thirsty overnight. If I wake up thirsty, I feel more sluggish and am less likely to get out of bed right away. If I don’t get out of bed right away, I feel rushed in the morning and off-kilter for the rest of the day. It’s a deadly cycle, and it can all be fixed by drinking more water.
  • Wash the dishes as they happen. I don’t drink enough water if I can’t fill up my Brita filter, and that’s dependent on me having enough room for it in the sink. Also, everything just looks neater (and feels calmer) when I wash the dishes as I use them, rather than batch them and turn dish-washing into a 45-minute marathon.
  • Remove feeds from my phone. I removed email, social media, news from my phone (with the exception of Slack, which I keep on a close notification-leash). Now I’m less distracted by notifications and less inclined to habitually check my phone for new information, and I feel calmer in general.
  • Avoid screens anywhere near bed. I’ve talked about this before. If my phone is near my bed, I’ll check it before I go to sleep, and staring into a blinding beam of pure information is not good for the circadian rhythm. I’ll also check it first thing in the morning, which will put me in a reactive mode for the whole day. Better to keep it plugged in across the room, where it’s reachable in an emergency by far enough away that I can only use it deliberately.
  • Choose hours to be offline. I go screens-off for a while before bed so I can read and settle down without distraction, and I avoid the internet before 8am so I can go through my morning routine wihtout the world intruding.
  • Sit quietly for a few minutes each morning. Just sit there, eyes closed, breathing deeply for a few minutes. This does wonders for increasing my calm, and gives me the sense that I control the events of the day, rather than letting the events of the day control me.